Complete 4-Week Fat Shredding Program

Complete 4-Week Fat Shredding Program

Transforming your body will challenge your limits. When you want to completely transform your body, you need to burn body fat, build muscle, and improve your overall health.

Over the next 28 days, I'll walk you through getting shredded.

One thing I'd like to say is this isn't a "miracle workout," meaning if you are 100 pounds overweight, you won't look stage ready for a bodybuilding competition. In order to get thoroughly shredded from this workout, you'll need to be closer to a healthy weight.

Related - 70 Day Fat Shred

If you have a bit of weight to lose, however, this workout will get you on the gains train in no time.

We aren't going to use any fad diets or impossible training routine. You aren't going to see any insider secrets that "melt the fat away." Instead, you're going to see a roadmap where I show you where you should focus your energy.

The amount of effort you put into the next four weeks will be a direct result of this routine. If you only put half into it, don't expect to reap the full benefits.

It's time to clean out the fridge and pantry β€” no more cupboards full of junk food. Start a list of things to buy, because you're going to need to put a little skin into the game to make it easier. We'll get into this in the nutrition overview section.

Nutrition Overview

The old saying "abs are made in the kitchen" is an understatement. What you eat and how much you eat determine whether you are building muscle, losing fat, burning muscle, or gaining fat.

If you undereat and over exercise, you'll lose weight... but you will burn precious muscle and look skinny fat. That's not a winning strategy. On the other end of the spectrum, if you overeat and try to out-exercise a bad diet, you won't make the progress you desire.

The key is finding the right balance between calorie intake and exercise. Think of cardio for improving heart health and conditioning, while lifting weights improves our strength levels and is the catalyst for building muscle.

How you perform, how much muscle you gain, or how much fat you burn is related to what you eat. I tried to out exercise my eating habits. I lost 120 pounds and gained more back. This second time around I'm down around 135 pounds, and I've exercised much less. Less than I care to admit, actually.

If you're looking for some tips on how to change your life, check out my article on what I learned from losing 120 pounds twice.

Over the next 28 days, I'm going to help you eat healthier foods and actually see a difference in your performance. While you should stick to this diet to the best of your abilities, you'll be happy to see you have a lot of choices.

This isn't the "starve yourself to no gains" diet. This is more the "if you follow these guidelines, you're going to see results" kind of diet. You aren't eliminating food groups, and you definitely can still have your favorite snack if you log it correctly.

The one caveat with this workout is you're going to have to learn how to cook. But I'll give you a few ways to quickly get started.

Things to Buy

If you have that shopping list ready, we'll go over a few things you need to buy and why. This doesn't have to cost you a month of income, but the better quality products you can purchase, the better.

Cookware

Having a nice full set of pots and pans make a huge difference in cooking. If you've never had to deal with a lousy pan that unevenly heats, lets food stick to it, and the coating starts flaking off after a month of uses... consider yourself lucky.

They say forming habits takes around 21 days, so following this routine will help you form some new healthy habits.

Cooking is going to be one of them.

So when looking for a decent cookware set, don't go the cheapest β€” you're going to use them daily. I use my pots, pans, or wok at least once per day.

If you can't afford to buy a complete set right now, buy a pot to cook rice in, a pan you can cook protein in, and if you can find a wok for a reasonable price, pick one up. More on the wok in the cooking tips section.

Knives

Buying decent cookware produces higher quality food... but some good knives are more important. A nice and sharp knife is safer than the dull knife that won't even cut through a tomato.

When learning how to cook, knife skills will need to be learned. Jump onto YouTube and check out how to improve your knife skills. This isn't doing cool tricks with your knife β€” it's about learning how to cut uniform size.

A sharp knife will easily slice through raw meat. Too many times I would try to cut some chicken up for a stir fry, and my pieces look smashed and ripped. It just isn't a good look.

So buy a quality knife set. Buy an automatic sharpener or use a steel rod sharpener as the chefs do. If you are committed to getting healthy and making this your lifestyle, this will make a more significant difference than trying to out-exercise a crap diet.

The more comfortable you are in your kitchen, the more likely you will feel compelled to cook in your kitchen.

Cutting Board

Pick up a few cutting boards. These don't need to be top of the line, but pick up a few β€” it keeps you from having to do dishes every single time you cook.

I like having a few different sized cutting boards. I have a larger cutting board for meats or when I am meal-prepping a bunch of vegetables β€” more on this in the cooking tips section.

Tupperware and Shaker Cups

Buy yourself a big Tupperware pack β€” you're going to need it. Buying cheap here works because they will get old, discolor, and eventually break.

You can pick some up at the dollar store if you want the cheap ones, but I generally find one brand and stick to it. That way when you buy more, the extra lids you have will fit. I don't know about you, but I can't stand trying to find the right lid to use.

Shaker cups are great for your supplements, but they are also a great to-go cup. Some days I'll have coffee and whey, other times it'll be BCAAs.

Pick up a few shaker cups and use them for your new cups β€” you won't be disappointed.

Baggies and Other Storage Materials

Buy a few different sized storage baggies. Add aluminum foil and parchment paper to the list, too. Storage baggies are great for meal prep, and they are extremely helpful when trying to portion out food you may struggle with portion size.

For example, I decided to skip portioning out an entire bag of Doritos into ten baggies, so I ended up eating the whole bag. All 1500 calories worth. If this sounds like something you do, I promise you that baggies will help.

As you learn to cook more and budget your grocery bill, you will see that buying meat in bulk is more cost effective. Many times, you can get a three-pound pack of chicken for a cheaper-per-pound price than buying an individual pound.

But it sucks having to defrost all of it just to cook a meal. So as soon as you get your groceries, take the time to break down your proteins into individual baggies.

This is going to help in a few ways:

  • An individual serving defrosts faster than a whole chunk of frozen meat.
  • You can create each serving, so you know exactly how much you are eating.
  • You can use baggies to store your fresh fruits and veggies as snacks throughout the day.
  • You can break down an entire bag of Doritos and have ten servings instead of one.

Food Scale

When it comes to actually losing weight, eyeballing your food can only get you so far. Just being conscious of how much you are eating will help you lose weight, but weighing your food produces consistent results.

I think I picked my food scale up for $10 or $15 so it's not going to break the bank.

Measuring Cups and Spoons

Just like a food scale, most of the foods you'll be eating need to be measured. Use the 1 cup measuring cup to get your serving of rice.

Buy a couple of sets of measuring cups and spoons. They are cheap and having a couple of sets means you won't have to stop in the middle of cooking to clean them out to use them again.

Herbs, Spices, and Sauces

The difference between a healthy meal and a tasty, healthy meal is how you season it.

Something that inspires me to cook more is all of the flavors. You can take a simple chicken breast and "visit Greece" by making a Greek souvlaki marinade with some olive oil, lemon, garlic, oregano, mint, parsley, and some salt and pepper. You could also check out Spain by using some smoked paprika, garlic powder, salt and pepper, ground cumin, chili powder, coriander, and some Italian seasoning.

If you really like food, this should make your mouth water. And that's why I love cooking.

So buy a spice rack if possible. There are many complete sets of spices you can buy. Or, every time you to go to the store, pick up one or two new spices or seasonings.

It's the difference between having the same pork loin all week or having four different variations of it.

Body Weight Scale

Having a scale to measure your progress is necessary, but we aren't going to solely rely our progress on what the scale says.

Buy yourself a decent bodyweight scale β€” many now have sensors that can measure different body composition indicators such as your BMI, body fat percent, water percent, skeletal muscle, fat-free body weight, muscle mass, bone mass, protein, basal metabolism, subcutaneous fat, visceral fat, and metabolic age.

The scale I bought was $30, and it is a RENPHO Bluetooth scale. It's one of the most popular results from Amazon, and I like it. The scale seems to be entirely accurate, but you should expect different results compared to having a skinfold test or weighing yourself hydrostatically.

What I mean is the readings are accurate to the scale, and they seem to be congruent with my progress. Use these indicators as a measure of progress, but don't solely rely on them.

Optional Purchases

Here are a few extra things that are nice to have, but not necessary. Pick these up as you have some extra cash.

  • A lunchbox to carry your meals in makes a huge difference. You won't ever have to stress about when or what you will eat since you have it with you β€” no more succumbing to office temptations.
  • A rice cooker can help prepare perfect rice every time. This is something I'm going to pick up soon.
  • An instapot or crockpot make easy meals. Cut up some fresh potatoes, carrots, and onions, put a hunk of meat in with some broth or water, and come home from work to a hearty ready to eat a meal.
  • Air fryers are relatively new to the market, but they make some great foods. Enjoy the wonderful Maillard reaction that breaks down sugars and proteins that create the golden brown exterior we love... but without having to submerge it in hot oil.

This is another one on my list to buy.

An instant-read thermometer is nice to have. Mine broke so I have to guess more than I'd like. If you don't want to a "microwave the food the rest of the way" emergency, pick one up.

Food Choices

When it comes to food choices, I don't want you to think "elimination." What I want you to think about is nutrition. No, that doesn't mean salads only, it means taking a look at your overall food consumption.

Do you eat fresh fruits and vegetables so you can have the vitamins, minerals, and fiber to stay healthy? Do you choose fresh proteins? Do you shop the perimeter of the store?

Or do you buy microwaveable dishes and rely on companies to produce the cheapest quality food that only costs $1? When you look at your calorie intake, does it stuff as much nutrition as possible or do you enjoy sinful foods and try to eat healthy on the side?

Your food choices will make the most significant difference in how you progress, so I'll go over some food basics to give you some ideas on how to transform some chicken breast into a nutritious chicken parmesan.

Proteins

  • Eggs
  • Almonds
  • Pistachios
  • Cashews
  • Chicken Breast
  • Oats
  • Greek Yogurt
  • Cottage Cheese
  • Broccoli - believe it or not, calorie for calorie this is very high in protein compared to other veggies
  • Milk
  • Beef
  • Tuna
  • Salmon
  • Quinoa
  • Lentils
  • Ezekiel Bread
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Flax Seeds
  • Sunflower Seeds
  • Chia Seeds
  • Peanuts
  • Turkey Breast
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Shrimp

Carbohydrates

  • Oats
  • Quinoa
  • Bananas
  • Buckwheat
  • White Potatoes
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Beetroots
  • Oranges
  • Blueberries
  • Apples
  • Grapefruit
  • Kidney Beans
  • Chickpeas
  • Brown Rice
  • White Rice

Fats

  • Avocados
  • Cheese
  • Dark Chocolate
  • Whole Eggs
  • Nuts
  • Salmon
  • Chia Seeds
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Coconut Oil
  • Full-Fat Yogurt

Logging Your Food

Now that you have a shopping list ready with the products you need to make cooking easier and the foods you are going to cook with, I need to go over the importance of logging your food.

Remember how I said I lost 120 pounds twice? The first time I did it without logging food... and I gained my weight back. The second time around I didn't start logging my food until I had lost around 60 pounds.

Once I started logging my food, my progress doubled.

For the next 28 days, it's essential that you log your food. You can do this on a spiral notebook, on your phone, or use a food logging app. I use MyFitnessPal because you can scan barcodes and save foods you eat often.

It's a no-brainer.

Every bite of food and calorie-filled drink you need to log.

Food Logging Tips

It's impossible to plan everything out, so don't get discouraged if you have to log foods on the fly. It has taken some discipline, but that's how I log food. Generally, I will open my app to see how many calories I have left, see what I want to cook and compile my list before I cook.

Instead of trying to plan everything out, I pick a protein, a carb, and find as many veggies as I can put into the dish. Knowing how many calories I can eat, I can then weight out my meats, portion out my carbs, and go heavy handed on the veggies.

Logging your food is great because once you have the discipline, you can eat fully-loaded nachos you created since you know exactly what's in it. There are no surprises, and you don't need to feel guilty about eating it.

It merely takes the effort to log and hold yourself accountable β€” your food log is your black and white proof if you've been screwing up or not.

What You Should Ask Yourself Before You Eat

The most pivotal part of my journey happened when I started asking myself if I'm getting fuel from something or merely eating it.

Is that burrito full of nutrition or is it full of calories? Would I rather have four more ounces of meat instead of a serving of mac and cheese? What veggies can I add to this dish?

Don't be afraid to barter with your food choices. That is, you can have bread with your meal, but would you rather have a little more meat and tasty fats instead?

Would you rather skip your 400 calorie dessert and have an extra five ounces of stir fry pork?

Once you start looking at your food objectively instead of "what am I craving," you'll start making sensible decisions that are healthier.

For example, I was really hungry last night without many calories to spare, so I ateΒ one pound of broccoli with four ounces of meat to fill me up. The broccoli was around 120 calories.

So start asking yourself what are you gaining nutritionally from something.

Daily Food Requirements

Now that you have a list of foods you can shop for, how much food should you be eating?

Since everybody has different metabolic needs, we can get an idea by calculating our total daily energy expenditure. Jump over to our TDEE calculator and fill out your weight, height, age, and activity level.

Lean towards a conservative activity level β€” you may not be burning as many calories as you think. Now that you have your TDEE, we can breakdown how many calories should come from proteins, fats, and carbohydrates.

Since getting shredded is the goal, we are going to operate with a 15% calorie deficit. For example, if your TDEE is 2,000 calories, we are going to reduce our intake to 1,700 calories per day. Generally speaking, a small 100-250 calorie deficit per day is recommended for steady weight loss, but we are on a mission.

Cooking Tips

Whenever a friend asks me for advice to lose weight, I immediately tell them to learn to cook. You should hear the excuses. "I don't know how" is the first thing they tell me.

So if you are a beginner to cooking, here is a list of some cooking tips that can help you get started.

#1 - Start With Pasta

If you've never touched any appliances in your kitchen, learning to cook pasta is easy, and it's pretty hard to mess up completely.

Get yourself a box of pasta like elbow macaroni or another pasta you like. Fill up a pot just above halfway with water, put your pot on the stove, and turn the heat up to high.

After what feels like the longest few minutes, the water will start boiling. Add a generous pinch of salt to your water and then put your pasta into the pot.

Follow the directions on the packaging on how long to boil it. As it gets closer to the time, it says to cook the pasta, pull out a piece of pasta and try it. If you like your pasta to have more of a bite, you will want to stop cooking pasta earlier than someone who wants a less firm bite.

#2 - Bake Some Chicken

Now that you cooked up some pasta on the stove, the next thing you can try is to bake some boneless skinless chicken breast.

Pull your chicken out of the refrigerator and let it sit out. This isn't going to give you salmonella; it's going to allow the chicken to warm up some so it will cook evenly. If you cook and have a problem of the inside of your chicken breast not being fully cooked while the outside is done, this is why.

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.

Drizzle some olive oil over your chicken breasts and use your hands to coat it evenly. Season your food. Use salt and pepper at the bare minimum. This is the difference between your grandma's cooking and a chef.

Use foil or lightly spray some non-stick spray on a baking dish or pan. This will keep it from sticking. The foil helps with cleanup.

Put your chicken into your preheated oven and cook for 22 to 26 minutes or until they reach an internal temperature of 165. Flip the breasts about halfway through.

Pull the chicken breasts out of the oven and let the meat rest for at least five minutes. This is going to allow the juices to soak back into the meat and increase your flavors.

Once you successfully bake some chicken, look up a salsa chicken recipe. You can thank me later.

#3 - Try Stir Fry Style Dishes

Out of all of the ways you can prepare dishes, I've found stir fry style to be the most natural and most cost-effective. Cooking meat can be stressful, but once you learn how to use all of your senses and keep track of time, it's no big deal.
But what if you want to save more time? Meet stir fry.

Buy some bulk meat like a pork loin or some chicken breast. Grab your sharp knife and start cutting the meat into similar sized cubes. Think about your favorite restaurant and how they do it.

Put the cut up meat into a Tupperware container, and you now have hibachi style meat to use in your dishes.

Put your pan or wok on the stove, turn the heat to about medium or medium-high, and let it preheat. Now is the time to weigh out your protein and prepare your fresh veggies.

Chopping up veggies and putting them into containers all in one day so you can use them throughout the week is necessary. It will turn having to do dishes, cut your veggies and meat, and then cooking into a pick which containers you want, weigh them out, and cook.

Seriously, you can make pretty much any stir fry dish in less than 15 minutes.

So weigh out and plan what you will eat β€” grab mushrooms, bell peppers, onions, hot peppers, and a protein. Throw them in your preheated pan with a little olive oil and cook. Move the food around while it cooks and ensures everything gets cooked. You'll see the meat slowly lose its pink and veggies will start to get translucent and appear cooked.

Use your senses β€” stir fry is the easiest way you can cook dishes with tremendous flavor.

#4 - Use All of Your Senses

When you are cooking, you can tell if your pan is too hot by how loud it is sizzling. Too high will cook the outside of your meat while the inside is raw.

Use your ears to listen to your food. It's talking to you.

When you throw fresh garlic and onions into a hot pan, the room will smell great. Throw in some protein, and as your protein cooks, a smell develops that lets you know it's done.

If you ignore it, the next smell will be more like a campfire.

Look at your food while you cook. Is it cooking evenly? When you go to flip your chicken you are pan searing, is it burned? Does it not fully have a golden brown crust?

Pay attention to the details of your food.

When you get more experienced cooking, you'll be able to tell if a protein is cooked by how it feels when you press into it β€” the rarer the meat, the "softer" the feel. As your meat gets overcooked, it will be less springy and more like a brick.

You'll be able to tell how long your pasta has by how it feels when you stir the water, and you'll be able to "just know" when things are done.

Lastly, but maybe the most important, is to taste your food as you go. Tasting your food and seasoning to your tastes makes a dish of stir fry chicken and broccoli that is hard to swallow into a spicy Szechuan stir fry.

#5 - Most Recipes Are Just Ideas

I've had some good luck with many friends starting to cook their own foods. Many of them subscribe to my stir fry methods because they are easy.

The biggest thing about cooking I think many people forget is that recipes are merely suggestions for flavor.

By that, I mean there is a certain way you cook meat. Each meat has a different internal temperature that needs to be met, but when you bake chicken, it's a certain temperature and time. You bake a turkey, and it's a certain temperature and time.

What you season it with is what makes it the recipe.

So don't get hung up on trying to learn new recipes by the book. Learn the foundations of cooking β€” how to cook protein, how to cook vegetables, and how to combine ingredients to make something tasty and healthy.

Supplement Overview

I never recommend supplements to someone who hasn't gotten a grip on their eating. If you aren't cooking at least half of your meals at home by now, you're better off spending your supplement money on nutritious foods.

Once you are taking control of your nutrition, supplements can help improve your performance, recovery, and overall well-being.

Pre-Workout

A pre-workout can help give you the energy to lift more and provide an edge to your training and focus.

There are a lot of choices for pre-workouts. You have some with stimulants like caffeine, while others are stimulant-free. Some pre-workouts can improve your pump, focus, and other parts of your training, too.

Do your research and find a pre-workout that works with your training style and budget. Here is a list of our best pre-workout supplements.

Creatine

Creatine is one of the most extended studied sports supplements out there.

Picking yourself up some creatine monohydrate could help improve your overall strength and recovery.

Do your research to see if creatine is right for you. It is extremely cheap.

Protein

A good whey protein can help you get plenty of protein into your diet. They are not considered a meal replacement, but they are great to drink after you work out.

Check out this article on how to pick the best protein powder.

Other Supplements

Here are some supplements that are nice to have.

  • Glutamine
  • Branched-chain amino acids
  • Coffee or caffeine
  • Post-workout
  • Multivitamin - not needed if you eat nutritious foods

Training Overview

We've got a solid nutrition foundation; now it's time to lift some weights and make some gains.

Here is your training blueprint for the next 28 days.

Day 1 - Back and Biceps

Spend five to ten minutes performing cardio and active mobility drills to warm up.

  • Bent Over Barbell Rows - three sets of 12 reps
  • Seated Wide Grip Rows - four sets of 12 reps
  • Close Grip Lat Pulldown - three sets of 15 reps
  • Hammer Curls - four sets of eight reps
  • Preacher Curls - four sets of 12 reps
  • Pull-Ups - two sets of as many as possible

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

  • Warming up is essential.
  • Perform quality reps and don't cheat yourself.

Day 2 - Shoulders and Triceps

Spend five to ten minutes performing cardio and active mobility drills to warm up.

  • Seated Military Press - four sets of eight reps
  • Arnold Press - three sets of eight reps
  • Bent Over Lateral Raise - four sets of 15 reps
  • Dumbbell Shrugs - three sets of 20 reps
  • Skull Crushers - four sets of eight reps
  • Rope Pushdowns - three sets of 12 reps

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

  • Keep the tempo slower for your shoulders so you can achieve more time under tension.

Day 3 - Active Rest

Time to stay out of the gym today, but we have some work to do.

  • Planks - three sets of 30 to 60 seconds
  • Side Planks - two sets per side as long as possible
  • Walking Lunges - perform walking lunges for 60 seconds
  • Mobility Exercises - move around and stretch and massage tender areas

Daily Workout Tips

  • Try to get a walk in β€” it will help you recover, and you can enjoy the weather.

Day 4 - Legs

You can't forget leg day. Take five to ten minutes to warm up and get your core temperature up.

  • Barbell Back Squats - four sets of 12 reps
  • Romanian Deadlift - four sets of 12 reps
  • Leg Extensions - four sets of 15 reps
  • Leg Press - four sets of eight reps
  • Seated Calf Raise - three sets of 15 reps
  • Standing Calf Raise - two sets of 20 reps

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

  • Perform squats with good form β€” it's better to perform squats with less weight perfectly than create bad habits with heavy weight.
  • Don't skip leg day.

Day 5 - Chest and Calves

Spend five to ten minutes warming up and get your chest ready for some pressing.

  • Barbell Bench Press - four sets of 12 reps
  • Incline Dumbbell Chest Press - three sets of 15 reps
  • Decline Chest Flyes - three sets of 20 reps
  • Chest Press Machine - two sets to failure
  • Donkey Calf Raises - three sets of 12 reps
  • Seated Calf Raise - two sets of 20 reps

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

  • Use a full range of motion for all exercises.

Day 6 - Active Rest

You've been working out hard, time to get some recovery.

Take today and walk as much as you can. There are no exercises today, but staying active and moving around will improve your overall recovery.

Day 7 - Active Rest

Today you should feel more refreshed, but we're going to take a break from the gym. Here are some exercises to perform today.

  • Jumping Jacks - three sets of 20
  • Mountain Climbers - two sets of 45 seconds
  • Walking Lunges - two sets of 45 seconds

Daily Workout Tips

  • Lightly massage and stretch any tender areas.

Day 8 - Back and Biceps

Take 10 minutes to warm up today. You're going to need it.

  • Deadlifts - five sets of eight reps
  • Pendlay Rows - four sets of eight reps
  • 1 Arm Dumbbell Rows - four sets of 12 reps
  • Pull-Ups - two sets until failure
  • Barbell Preacher Curls - three sets of 12 reps
  • Dumbbell Curls - three sets of 15 reps

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

  • Explode with your deadlifts and Pendlay rows.
  • Use a slower tempo than usual with your bicep curls.

Day 9 - Shoulders and Triceps

Spend ten minutes performing some light shoulder mobility work and get your core body temperature up.

  • Dumbbell Overhead Press - four sets of 12 reps
  • Side Lateral Raise - four sets of 15 reps
  • Barbell Shrugs - three sets of 20 reps
  • Close Grip Bench Press - four sets of 12 reps
  • Stiff Arm Pull Downs - three sets of eight reps
  • Dips - three sets of 12 reps

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

  • Make sure you warm up your shoulders.

Day 10 - Active Rest

Take today off, move around when you can, and enjoy some nutritious foods. You've earned it.

Day 11 - Legs

  • Legs again... today may be rough.
  • Leg Press - four sets of 12 reps
  • Stiff Leg Deadlift - four sets of eight reps
  • Goblet Squats - three sets of 15 reps
  • Leg Extensions - four sets of 20 reps
  • Leg Curls - four sets of 20 reps
  • Walking Lunges - perform walking lunges for three sets of 60 seconds

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

Keep your legs moving between sets to keep them loose.

Day 12 - Chest and Calves

Chest day!

  • Barbell Bench Press - four sets of 12 reps
  • Decline Barbell Bench Press - four sets of eight reps
  • Incline Dumbbell Flyes - three sets of 15 reps
  • Chest Press Machine - three sets until failure
  • Seated Calf Raises - five sets of 15 reps
  • Donkey Calf Raises - three sets of 8 reps

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

Add a slight pause when the bar is to your chest before pressing for a more intense workout.

Use a full range of motion for your calf raises.

Day 13 - Active Rest

We'll need to walk today to help with recovery. Take 15 minutes to go for a walk or perform some extra house chores today. Here are a few exercises to perform.

  • Active Mobility - spend 10 minutes moving and stretching your body
  • Sit Ups - three sets of 15 reps

Day 14 - Active Rest

Gauge how you feel today β€” if you are still sore, perform another 15-minute walk and take a nice hot bath at night.

Stretch and lightly massage any tender areas.

Day 15 - Back and Biceps

Spend five to ten minutes warming up and get your back ready for some pulls.

  • Barbell Curls - four sets of 12 reps
  • Hammer Curls - three sets of eight reps
  • T-Bar Rows - four sets of 12 reps
  • Wide Grip Lat Pull Down - four sets of 12 reps
  • Close Grip Lat Pull Down - four sets of 12 reps
  • Row Machine - two sets until failure

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

Focus on maintaining tension throughout the lift.

Day 16 - Shoulders and Triceps

Today will be higher volume, so spend five to ten minutes warming up and getting your shoulders ready for some work.

  • Dumbbell Overhead Press - four sets of 15 reps
  • Side Lateral Raise - four sets of 12 reps
  • Seated Close Grip Military Press - three sets of 15 reps
  • Dips - four sets of 12 reps
  • Rope Pushdowns - four sets of 20 reps
  • Close Grip Push Up - three sets until failure

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

Warm your shoulders and rotator cuffs up before you train.

Day 17 - Active Rest

Today is a good day to rest and stay out of the gym. Spend today being as active as you can, but put most of your effort into recovery.

Day 18 - Legs

Leg day is back, so spend five to ten minutes warming up.

  • Walking Lunges - four sets for 45 seconds
  • Box Jumps - three sets of 5 reps
  • Stiff Leg Deadlift - four sets of 12 reps
  • Goblet Squats - four sets of 15 reps
  • Standing Calf Raise - three sets of 20 reps
  • Leg Extensions - three sets until failure

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

  • Make each rep count.

Day 19 - Chest, Calves, Abs

Time for a fun day of some volume. Warm up for five to ten minutes before jumping into lifting.

  • Incline Barbell Bench Press - four sets of 15 reps
  • Dumbbell Bench Press - three sets of 15 reps
  • Pec Dec - three sets of 20 reps
  • Donkey Calf Raise - three sets of 12 reps
  • Seated Calf Raise - three sets of 20 reps
  • Mountain Climbers - three sets of 45 seconds
  • Planks - three sets held as long as possible

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

  • Try to keep rest between sets low today.

Day 20 - Active Rest

Take today off from the gym and try to take a 20-minute walk and stretch or massage any tender areas.

Day 21 - Active Rest

Today you'll do a few exercises at home to keep you moving.

  • Jumping Jacks - four sets of 20 reps
  • Side Planks - two sets of 60 seconds per side
  • Push Ups - two sets of as many as possible

Daily Workout Tips

  • You don't need to push yourself too hard, but make sure to be active and perform the exercises at some point throughout the day.

Day 22 - Back and Biceps

Here are your last back and biceps workout for this routine. Go big or go home. Give yourself five to ten minutes to properly warm up.

  • Deadlifts - four sets of 12 reps
  • Pendlay Rows - three sets of 10 reps
  • 1 Arm Dumbbell Row - four sets of 15 reps
  • Seated Close Grip Rows - three sets of 20 reps
  • Hammer Curls - four sets of 12 reps
  • Alternating Curls - four sets of 12 reps
  • Pull-Ups - two sets until failure

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

  • Make your reps count.

Day 23 - Shoulders and Triceps

Last shoulder day. Do you have much left in the tank? Give yourself five to ten minutes to properly warm up.

  • Military Press - four sets of 12 reps
  • Push Press - three sets of 8 reps
  • Bent Over Lateral Raise - four sets of 20 reps
  • Face Pulls - three sets of 15 reps
  • Dips - four sets of 12 reps
  • Rope Pushdowns - four sets of 20 reps
  • Close Grip Push Ups - three sets until failure

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

Warm your shoulders up; they are going to need it.

Day 24 - Active Rest

Get outside today and sweat. Do some sprints, go hiking, or hop on a bike and go for a ride.

Day 25 - Legs

Your last leg day is here. Give yourself five to ten minutes to properly warm up.

  • Barbell Back Squat - four sets of 15 reps
  • Romanian Deadlifts - four sets of 12 reps
  • Goblet Squats - four sets of 20 reps
  • Leg Extensions - two sets until failure
  • Leg Curls - two sets until failure
  • Seated Calf Raise - three sets until failure

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

Drop the weight today as you up the volume β€” you're looking for quality reps, not sloppy half reps.

Day 26 - Chest and Triceps

Last chest day and we will pound triceps one more time in this routine.

  • Incline Dumbbell Bench Press - four sets of eight reps
  • Chest Press Machine - three sets of 20 reps
  • Decline Barbell Bench Press - three sets of 12 reps
  • Close Grip Bench Press - four sets of 15 reps
  • Skull Crushers - four sets of eight reps
  • Chest Dips - two sets of 12 reps

Take 5 minutes to cool down from lifting and perform 15 minutes of HIIT cardio post-workout.

Daily Workout Tips

Use quality reps and keep your rest between sets low.

Day 27 - Active Rest

One more day until you are done with this gauntlet of workouts. Take 30 minutes today to go for a walk and perform a few exercises.

  • Mountain Climbers - three sets of 45 seconds
  • Sit Ups - two sets of 20 reps
  • Jumping Jacks - three sets of 30 reps

Daily Workout Tips

  • Treat yourself to a massage or nice bath; you've earned it.
  • Drink extra water today.

Day 28 - Day of Reckoning

Time to take a look at what you've accomplished. If you've been tracking your weight progress and seeing changes in the mirror and how your clothes fit, how do your results look?

How many new habits have you created or replaced bad habits with healthy habits?

No exercise today β€” bask in your glorious wins, laugh at how you wanted to quit halfway through and enjoy the new physique and lifestyle.

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